Tag Archives: recipe

Finnish Runeberg’s Cakes

Runeberg's Cakes - 2women2cats

This is one of the Finnish desserts that probably every single Finn has had in their life. It is eaten on Runeberg’s Day on the 5th of February. Usually these cakes start to appear in the stores in January. The bought cakes are nice, but naturally nowhere near as good as self made ones. First of all they rarely have rum in them!

Runeberg's Cakes - 2women2cats

If you don’t like the flavour of rum, you can as well leave it out and replace it with lemon or orange juice. The Finn Crisps used in the recipe are a type of thin rye crispbread that is found everywhere in Finland. I’m not sure how common it is in other countries, but I know it is found at least in Germany. If you can’t get it anywhere, you can also replace it with gingerbread, speculoos or dark breadcrumbs.

Traditionally the cakes are baked in special Runeberg’s cake tins (cylinder shaped) but you can use a muffin silicone form or dessert rings. As you can see on the pictures I used different shapes for my cakes but I think the cylindrical ones looked the best.

Runeberg's Cakes - 2women2cats

The cakes should be really moist despite the amount of different crumbly ingredients. This is why they are moisturized with a water/sugar/rum mixture, and if you’re not eating the cakes on the day of the making, you should give them a small bath before serving.

Runeberg's Cakes - 2women2cats

Runeberg's Cakes - 2women2cats

Runeberg’s Cakes (6 pieces)

Ingredients

50 g almonds
45 g Finn Crisps
45 g breadcrumbs
90 g plain white flour
100 g butter (room temperature)
90 g sugar
1 tsp baking powder
1 tsp ground cardamom
1 egg
100 ml heavy cream
2 drops bitter almond aroma

100 ml water
25 g brown cane sugar
1 tbsp rum

raspberry jam
powder sugar and water

Crush the almonds into a rough crumble with a food processor. Do the same with the Thin Crisps, but process them into a fine flour. Set them aside for later use.

Runeberg's Cakes - 2women2cats

Runeberg's Cakes - 2women2cats

Whip the butter and sugar into a foam and add the egg while whisking.
Mix the dry ingredients together and add them to the batter. Pour in the cream, add two drops of bitter almond and whisk just until everything is evenly incorporated.

Runeberg's Cakes - 2women2cats

Runeberg's Cakes - 2women2cats

Pour the batter into a muffin pan or your desired tins. Bake at 200°C for 20-25 minutes. While the cakes are in the oven, make the rum/water/sugar mixture. Heat up the water in a pan, dissolve the sugar in it and add the rum.

When you take the cakes out of the oven, pour some of the water mixture on them immediately and let them cool down in the pan. You can smooth out the tops with your fingers to give them a flatter look.

To make the sugar ring take a few spoons of powder sugar and add just enough water to make a paste. Don’t let it get too thin! Pour into a piping bag and decorate each cake with a sugar ring. Add a spoonful of raspberry jam in the middle.

Enjoy!

Tiia

Runeberg's Cakes - 2women2cats

Runeberg's Cakes - 2women2cats

Advertisements

Saaristolaisleipä – A Traditional Finnish Bread

I have been making our own bread for quite a while. If I have enough time on my hands I usually make sourdough bread but it is not as failproof as normal yeast dough and really time consuming. For a few weeks now I have tried to master an Estonian sourdough rye bread but I keep on failing miserably. I can tell you that nothing is worse than having to throw a fresh loaf into the trash!

I decided to have a break from Estonian bread making, so next on my agenda was a traditional Finnish bread – saaristolaisleipä. Often translated as Islander or Archipelago bread, it consists of rye and wheat flour with rye malt and dark syrup. The malt gives the bread the dark look that is typical for this bread and the syrup a soft and sticky consistency and a slight sweet flavour. And the best thing: it isn’t a sourdough bread and therefore easier to make (at least for me).

Saaristolaisleipä - A traditional Finnish Bread

The recipe I used was originally for three breads but in case I would fail again I only made two. I also converted the measurements into grams since Finnish recipes mostly use deciliters for measuring and it tends to confuse people too much.

Ingredients

665 ml buttermilk, 2,5% fat
50 g fresh yeast
200 ml dark bread syrup (contains malt) or other dark syrup/treacle
150 g malt flour (I used rye malt)
60 g spelt bran (or wheat/rye bran)
130 g rye flour
400 g wheat flour
3/4 tbsp sea salt

For the glaze

1tbsp dark syrup
3 tbsp water

Spices (optional)

bread spices like coriander, fennel, cumin 
hemp seeds

Take a saucepan and heat the buttermilk on the stove until it’s lukewarm. Crumble the yeast into it and let is dissolve slightly, then add the syrup.

In a big bowl mix all the dry ingredients (including spices if you like) and then slowly add the buttermilk/yeast mixture while stirring with a wooden spoon or silicone spatula. You don’t have to mix it for long but make sure everything is properly incorporated. The dough will be quite liquid, unlike wheat dough. Cover with a towel and let it rise for around 1,5 hours in room or above room temperature. I put it on our bathroom floor which has floorheating. Make sure to check the dough every once in a while because how fast it will rise depends a lot on the temperature and also texture of the dough. The dough is ready when it has doubled in size.

Make sure to preheat the oven to 175°C before the rising time is up. Grease two loaf tins with butter and divide the dough into two parts. Distribute it equally between the tins and smooth out with wet hands. You can then add hemp seeds on top of the breads if you like. Bake them on the lowest rack for 2 hours. Spray a bit of water into the oven or keep a little bowl with water underneath the breads to keep them moist. Depending on your oven you might need to cover them with tinfoil after an hour to prevent the top from burning.

For the sticky glaze mix the syrup with the water and brush the breads with it 15 – 30 minutes before they are done. When the time is up, take the breads out of the tins immediately and brush the rest of the syrupy water on them. Then wrap each in parchment paper and wrap firmly with two towels. Let them  cool down like this completely or best overnight so they are well rested in the morning. Now it is time to taste your bread! Enjoy!

Stef

Saaristolaisleipä - A traditional Finnish Bread

Saaristolaisleipä - A traditional Finnish Bread

Saaristolaisleipä - A traditional Finnish Bread

 

Vegan Hazelnut Chocolate Chip Cookies

This year I wanted to try a few more vegan recipes, especially in baking. I saw these cookies on mywifemakes and immediately wanted to try them. They turned out to be delicious and I will definitely make them again. No one would ever guess they’re vegan and they are really easy to make! The raw dough still tasted a bit coconutty but I couldn’t taste any coconut flavour in the baked cookies. I also used my homemade peanut butter which is a really quick 1-ingredient recipe, while store bought jars often include extra oils, salt or sugar.

Ingredients

75 g virgin coconut oil, melted
110 g brown sugar
1 tbsp ground flax seeds
2 tbsp peanut butter
1/2 tsp vanilla bean powder
110 g plain flour
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/2 tsp baking powder
1/4 tsp sea salt & some for sprinkling the cookies
80 g vegan chocolate
50 g hazelnuts

Preheat the oven to 175°C, line a baking tray with parchment paper and roast the hazelnut for a few minutes.

To make the flax egg mix one tablespoon of ground flax seed with three tablespoons of water and set aside until it becomes gelatinous. In the meantime chop the nuts and the chocolate.

In a bowl whisk together the sugar, vanilla, coconut oil, peanut butter and flax egg. Add the flour, soda and baking powder and mix until everything is just incorporated. Then you can add the hazelnuts and the chocolate and carefully mix everything together. Drop the cookies with two spoons onto the tray or use your hands (I think hands are the easiest option) and flatten the cookies a bit. Sprinkle with sea salt and bake around 11-13 minutes. Let them cool down because they will be quite soft at first. Enjoy!

Stef

2women2cats: Vegan Hazelnut Chocolate Chip Cookies

2women2cats: Vegan Hazelnut Chocolate Chip Cookies

2women2cats: Vegan Hazelnut Chocolate Chip Cookies

Homemade Peanut Butter

Yesterday I wanted to make some vegan chocolate chip cookies until I noticed that I didn’t have any peanut butter at home and of course that was needed for the recipe. I decided to quickly roast some peanuts and make my own.

2women2cats: Homemade Peanut Butter

Making your own peanut butter is the easiest thing ever, way better and cheaper than store bought one. Also no additives, salt, sugar or oil. For peanut butter you’ll only need peanuts, that’s it. Should be obvious but when you look at the back of peanut butter jars in the store you’ll often be surprised.

2women2cats: Homemade Peanut Butter

Ingredients

200 g peanuts (with skin or peeled)

Heat up your oven to around 175°C and gently roast the peanuts for a few minutes on a tray. Don’t let them get too dark, otherwise the peanut butter will be quite bitter. If you bought peanuts that still have the skin, you need to let them cool down a bit and take the skins off. If you bought already peeled ones you can go ahead and start processing the nuts in a food processor. Depending on the type this might take while. I don’t have a Vitamix (unfortunately), so I need to scrape down the sides every once in a while so everything will be mixed evenly. The peanuts will first turn into flour and eventually into butter when the oils are released. Take a deep breath, it will smell awesome! Continue processing until the texture suits you. Store in a jar in the fridge or eat immediately. Enjoy!

Stef

Oh, and if you’re wondering about the cookies I mentioned in the beginning: they turned out perfect and I will put up the recipe here soon.

2women2cats: Homemade Peanut Butter

2women2cats: Homemade Peanut Butter

Moisturizing Avocado Face Mask

2women2cats: Moisturizing Face Mask DIY

In the wintertime my skin often needs a bit more care, especially here in Finland. The changes of temperature (coming from the cold and going to a heated apartment) stress the skin and often leave it a bit dry. This selfmade avocado mask is a great treatment for dry winter skin. Avocado contains lots of unsaturated fats and vitamins and will make your skin soft and nourished. Honey and ghassoul clay are great against blemishes, the rose water and aloe vera will add extra moisture. If you suffer from super dry skin you can also add a mild oil like sesame or grapeseed.

If you have the chance, use the mask in the sauna. The heat and steam will open up the pores on your face. If you don’t have a sauna, put the mask on right after a shower.

2women2cats: Moisturizing Face Mask DIY

Ingredients

1 ripe avocado
1 tsp honey
2 tsp ghassoul clay
rose water
pure aloe vera gel

Puree the avocado or mash with a fork. Add the honey and clay and as much rose water and aloe vera gel as needed to make the mask smooth but not too thin. Apply to clean skin and leave it on for about 20 minutes. Wash off with lots of warm water.

Leftovers can be stored in a jar in the fridge. The mask will stay good for around 4 days.

Stef

2women2cats: Moisturizing Face Mask DIY

2women2cats: Moisturizing Face Mask DIY

2women2cats: Moisturizing Face Mask DIY